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Woods Hole Film Festival - Work-In-Progress Screenwriting Awards

Woods Hole Film Festival - Work-In-Progress Screenwriting Awards

Contact

% 1679 Beacon Street, Second Floor
Brookline, MA 02445
(508) 495-FILM (3456) (voice)

Web: Click here
Email: Click here

Contact: J.P. Ouellette, Contest Director

Report Card

Overall: 2 stars2 stars (2.0/5.0)
Professionalism: 3 stars3 stars3 stars (3.0/5.0)
Feedback: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.0/5.0)
Signficance: 1.5 stars1.5 stars (1.3/5.0)
Report Cards: 7    
Have you entered?
Please submit a Report card.

Categories

Objective

To showcase independent screenplays and laud those who work independently to create the blueprints for our independent films; to seek out screenplays which appeal to the filmmakers and audiences that frequent the Woods Hole Film Festival: to present a reading of a winning screenplay to the WHFF audience and allow the screenwriter to hear their words made real and receive feedback from an audience, actors, and filmmakers.

Deadline/Entry Fees

Contact contest for this year's deadline.

Rules

Unproduced screenplays which have not won awards:

Category 1. Drama and Comedy. The open category. Scripts between 75 and 120 pages.

Category 2. Science Drama and Science Fiction. Stories which expand the audience knowledge of science or technology, point out social or cultural elements of science and technology, or further the recording of science history. Scripts between 55 and 120 pages. This is not a escapist horror or monster category. Examples of films in this category might be "Madame Curie," "Charley," "Solaris," and "Andromeda Strain."

Category 3. Short Film Drama or Comedy. Scripts of less than 30 pages which involve filming with live actors in dialogue situations.

Awards

Recognition and Career Advancement Opportunities. Reading of a winner’s screenplay during the festival with an audience, actors, and director for feedback.

Woods Hole Film Festival - Work-In-Progress Screenwriting Awards

Contact

% 1679 Beacon Street, Second Floor
Brookline, MA 02445
(508) 495-FILM (3456) (voice)

Web: Click here
Email: Click here

Contact: J.P. Ouellette, Contest Director

Report Card

Overall: 2 stars2 stars (2.0/5.0)
Professionalism: 3 stars3 stars3 stars (3.0/5.0)
Feedback: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.0/5.0)
Signficance: 1.5 stars1.5 stars (1.3/5.0)
Report Cards: 7    
Have you entered?
Please submit a Report card.

Categories

Contest Comments

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Woods Hole Film Festival - Work-In-Progress Screenwriting Awards

Contact

% 1679 Beacon Street, Second Floor
Brookline, MA 02445
(508) 495-FILM (3456) (voice)

Web: Click here
Email: Click here

Contact: J.P. Ouellette, Contest Director

Report Card

Overall: 2 stars2 stars (2.0/5.0)
Professionalism: 3 stars3 stars3 stars (3.0/5.0)
Feedback: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.0/5.0)
Signficance: 1.5 stars1.5 stars (1.3/5.0)
Report Cards: 7    
Have you entered?
Please submit a Report card.

Categories

Contest News

Woods Hole Writing Competition Announces Work-in-Progress Winners

The Woods Hole Writing Competition has announced their 2015 Work-in-Progress Contest Winners.

Updated: 08/27/2015

Woods Hole Film Festival Announces Screenplay Winners

The Wood Hole Film Festival has announced their 2005 Work-in-Progress Screenplay Competition Winners.

Updated: 07/19/2005

Woods Hole Film Festival - Work-In-Progress Screenwriting Awards

Contact

% 1679 Beacon Street, Second Floor
Brookline, MA 02445
(508) 495-FILM (3456) (voice)

Web: Click here
Email: Click here

Contact: J.P. Ouellette, Contest Director

Report Card

Overall: 2 stars2 stars (2.0/5.0)
Professionalism: 3 stars3 stars3 stars (3.0/5.0)
Feedback: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.0/5.0)
Signficance: 1.5 stars1.5 stars (1.3/5.0)
Report Cards: 7    
Have you entered?
Please submit a Report card.

Categories

Interviews

MovieBytes Interview:
Screenwriter Jon Seamans

An interview with screenwriter Jon Seamans regarding the Woods Hole Writing Competition.

Q: What's the title of the script you entered in this contest, and what's it about?

A: My script is called Plainville, Vermont, about a small-time New Haven con man named Tyler Quinn who is forced to leave town after two beatings and an eviction in the same day. Tracking down his only remaining family member, his maternal grandmother, he finds himself in the hamlet of Plainville which he discovers is run by a mayor far more corrupt than he could ever be. He runs for the office on a whim, wins the election with the help of his pal Renny and a stolen traffic light, and suddenly finds himself mayor of a town filled with citizens who spur him into doing good for the first time in his life in spite of himself. All goes well until deposed mayor Harlan Thibodeau starts dredging up the details of Quinn’s past and it’s a race for time as the pair head to a showdown at a tumultuous town meeting that will decide Tyler’s - and perhaps Plainville’s - fate.

Q: What made you enter this particular contest? Have you entered any other contests with this script? If so, how did you do?

A: I was familiar with the Woods Hole area - I have been going there since high school and I do a lot of spring and fall fishing in the area, plus I have friends who live right up the street so I figure if I won something I'd have a place to stay! It was actually the last in a series of contests I'd entered along with Scriptapalooza where it made the semifinals. An earlier draft was a quarterfinalist in Screen Expo 3 and apparently just missed the top 400 or so of the Nicholl Fellowships.

Q: Were you satisfied with the adminstration of the contest? Did they meet their deadlines? Did you receive all the awards that were promised?

A: Woods Hole is very much a funky indie filmmaker's festival so I had to kind of poke around and ask about things like a festival pass so I could attend screenings, etc. But once that was squared away I was treated very well and got to attend some memorable screenings and gatherings with the filmmakers. My script was chosen as Best Screenplay overall and given a staged reading mid-week. It was pretty amazing to see actors reading my lines for the first time. The organizers also presented me with the same award that the filmmakers receive, apparently the first year they did so.

Q: Were you given any feedback on your script? If so, did you find the feedback helpful?

A: The formal Q & A that was supposed to end the reading was derailed by a horde of invading folk dancers who raided the community hall like the mob of villagers in Frankenstein. I did get a bit of informal feedback after we reconvened at a bar across the street. But mostly I was pleased with amount of positive feedback I got on the screenplay, not only from those at the reading but others who read it during the week.

Q: Has your success in this contest helped you market your script? Were you contacted by any agents, managers or producers?

A: It certainly has helped in that now I can introduce it as the winner at the Woods Hole Film Festival. The fest itself seemed to be mostly geared toward the filmmakers, I didn't really meet anyone in the business end but made contact with a talented group of people whose movie was a big hit at the festival and I hope to connect with them on a future project.

Q: What's your background? Have you written any other screenplays or television scripts?

A: After spending 20+ years in the Boston rock scene as a guitarist/songwriter and supporting myself with writing gigs at newspapers and in city government, I learned screenwriting in 2002/3 from Scott Thompson and Stuart Kelban at Emerson College's evening continuing ed. program. Plainville, Vermont was my first script, written for the course.

Q: Do you live in Los Angeles? If not, do you have any plans to move there?

A: I presently live in Boston. No plans to move to LA but life moves in funny ways so if the opportunity arose I would certainly consider it.

Q: What's next? Are you working on a new script?

A: I am presently working on a pair of scripts set in England, now out of sequence because I realized one I had been holding off on was perfectly suited to a talented young British actor/director I met at Woods Hole. One is a dark comedy set in small village at the opening of World War II, the other covers an era in rock music along the lines of The Commitments and 24-Hour Party People.

Posted Tuesday, August 23, 2005